Nectar of the Gods

Anyone looking into creating a wildlife garden will know how important nectar rich plants are when looking to attract bees and butterflies to the garden. In the summer, I have a pretty reasonable range of nectar rich flowers for insects but at the end of January my garden was looking bleak. I was still waiting for my snowdrops and crocuses to come up and wanted to make sure that I had a good source of food for any reckless insects who decided to brave the grey days of February.

They weren’t the worst bit of my garden by any stretch of the imagination, but these planters caught my eye because they were so close to the house. I had used them for growing blueberries, but some kind of pest or disease spread through my plants like a wild-fire in the summer… it started on the right hand leaves and within two weeks the left hand leaves were falling off and all three plants were dead. They were the perfect thing to reuse to brighten up the winter with a nectar rich container garden.

We went to the local garden centre and splashed out £15 on some primroses and bulbs that were growing in pots- daffodils, crocuses, hyacinths and the like. Then I spent a happy, drizzly afternoon in the garden with my under gardener (toddlers love to dig) emptying half of the ericaceous compost from the pot and filling them up with top soil in which we planted the bulbs.

Result? I have some early opening flowers which are benefitting from being sheltered by the house and opening way earlier than the same flowers in more exposed positions, the insects have something of a winter soup kitchen and the under gardener is oh so proud of her first foray into gardening.

For more on bee friendly gardening see some great tips from Friends of the Earth’s Bee Friendly Garden campaign.

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