Lost Lavender

Last weekend, disaster struck my poor lavender plant. Or at least, last weekend saw the culmination of the problems that had crept upon my elderly lavender after two years of neglect. I hadn’t pruned the already woody and sprawling lavender since I was pregnant, then when I finally got around to it, I did a bit of a rush job and accidentally cut into dead wood. Last weekend I cut out the dead wood and was left with two long straggly branches with lavender growing at the end around a dead wood crown.

What had once been a beautiful lavender plant covering around a square metre, a buzz with bees and aflutter with butterflies, was a sparse, ivy-tangled monstrosity making a similar area of my garden look awful.

 

I was genuinely really upset. For the past six years, that lavender plant has been my favourite part of the garden. I’ve loved watching it come to life and seeing the wildlife enjoy it as much as I do, and though I have other nectar rich plants in the garden for pollinators, I knew it would leave a massive (both figurative and literal) hole in my garden. So I decided it needed to be replaced as soon as I could.

I used the healthy but straggly remains of the elderly plant and J.Arthur Bower’s Organic Rooting Powder to take a lot of cuttings in the hope that they will eventually form the basis of a similarly beautiful lavender hedge in our new garden when we move house. Really clear instructions on how to propagate lavender plants from cuttings can be found here.

While that little hedge gets going, I’ve bought the biggest lavender plant I could afford to replace my lost beauty. It just felt really important to me to replace as much nectar for the bees as I could (I’ll supplement with bedding plants on the bare soil) and hopefully whoever buys our house will love it as much as I loved the old plant so the bees and butterflies will have a lavender banquet for years to come.

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